Sunday, November 22, 2015

1933 Transfer Agreement, 1917 Balfour Declaration, WW 1, WW2, Adolf Hitler

I learn something new every day.  Today it was the Balfour Declaration.  I’m not taking any sides, just telling the truth that is hidden.  You can make up your own mind as to who runs the show.Per Wikipedia:
The Balfour Declaration (dated 2 November 1917) was a letter from the United Kingdom’s Foreign Secretary Arthur James Balfourto Baron Rothschild (Walter Rothschild, 2nd Baron Rothschild), a leader of the British Jewish community, for transmission to the Zionist Federation of Great Britain and Ireland.


His Majesty’s government view with favour the establishment in Palestine of a national home for the Jewish people, and will use their best endeavours to facilitate the achievement of this object, it being clearly understood that nothing shall be done which may prejudice the civil and religious rights of existing non-Jewish communities in Palestine, or the rights and political status enjoyed by Jews in any other country.[1][2]
The text of the letter was published in the press one week later, on 9 November 1917.[3] The “Balfour Declaration” was later incorporated into the Sèvres peace treaty with the Ottoman Empire and theMandate for Palestine. The original document is kept at the British Library.
Explication of the wording of the Balfour Declaration is found in the correspondence leading to the final version of the declaration. The phrase “national home” was intentionally used instead of “state” because of opposition to the Zionist program within the British Cabinet. Following discussion of the initial draft the Cabinet Secretary, Mark Sykes, met with the Zionist negotiators to clarify their aims. His official report back to the Cabinet categorically stated that the Zionists did not want “to set up a Jewish Republic or any other form of state in Palestine immediately”[23] but rather preferred some form of protectorate as provided in the Palestine Mandate. In approving the Balfour Declaration, Leopold Amery, one of the Secretaries to the British War Cabinet of 1917–18, testified under oath to the Anglo-American Committee of Inquiry in January 1946 from his personal knowledge that:
“The phrase ‘the establishment in Palestine of a National Home for the Jewish people’ was intended and understood by all concerned to mean at the time of the Balfour Declaration that Palestine would ultimately become a ‘Jewish Commonwealth’ or a ‘Jewish State’, if only Jews came and settled there in sufficient numbers.”[24]
Both the Zionist Organization and the British government devoted efforts over the following decades, including Winston Churchill‘s 1922 White Paper, to denying that a state was the intention.[a] However, in private, many British officials agreed with the interpretation of the Zionists that a state would be established when a Jewish majority was achieved.[25]
The initial draft of the declaration, contained in a letter sent by Rothschild to Balfour, referred to the principle “that Palestine should be reconstituted as the National Home of the Jewish people.”[26] In the final text, the word that was replaced with in to avoid committing the entirety of Palestine to this purpose. Similarly, an early draft did not include the commitment that nothing should be done which might prejudice the rights of the non-Jewish communities. These changes came about partly as the result of the urgings of Edwin Samuel Montagu, an influential anti-Zionist Jew and Secretary of State for India, who was concerned that the declaration without those changes could result in increased anti-Semitic persecution. The draft was circulated and during October the government received replies from various representatives of the Jewish community. Lord Rothschild took exception to the new proviso on the basis that it presupposed the possibility of a danger to non-Zionists, which he denied.[27] At San Remo, as shown in the transcript of the San Remo meeting on the evening of 24 April, the French proposed adding to the savings clause so that it would save for non-Jewish communities their “political rights” as well as their civil and religious rights. The French proposal was rejected.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Balfour_Declaration
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Haavara_Agreement